What is Solar Cosmic Radiation – Solar Particle Event – Definition

Solar cosmic radiation refers to sources of radiation in the form of high-energy particles (predominantly protons) emitted by the Sun, primarily in solar particle events (SPEs). Radiation Dosimetry
Cosmic Radiation - Natural Source of Radiation
Source: nasa.gov License: Public Domain

Solar cosmic radiation refers to sources of radiation in the form of high-energy particles (predominantly protons) emitted by the Sun, primarily in solar particle events (SPEs). The solar radiation incident on the upper atmosphere consist mostly of protons (99%), with energies generally below 100 MeV.  Solar particle events, for example, occur when protons emitted by the Sun become accelerated either close to the Sun during a flare or in interplanetary space by coronal mass ejection shocks. Note that, the Sun has an 11-year cycle, which culminates in a dramatic increase in the number and intensity of solar flares, especially during periods when there are numerous sunspots.

Solar radiation is a significant radiation hazard to spacecraft and astronauts, also produces significant dose rates at high altitudes, but only the most energetic radiation contribute to doses at ground level. ┬áNote that, anyone who had been on the Moon’s surface during a particularly violent solar eruption in 2005 would have received a lethal dose.

References:

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See also:

Cosmic Radiation

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